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The Training Session:
Set realistic goals and don’t try to teach too much.

Designing a Training Session:
(From the National Diploma School NSCAA)
1. What are the targets for the session?
a.) Don’t try to do too much in one session-pick one, two or three targets.
b.) Be Specific (narrow down the target-easier to design the session).
2. What are the most important factors involved. How does it happen in the game?
3. Where does it occur on the field?
4. What players are involved?
5. In how much space does it occur in the game?
6. Why does it occur?

Now you have enough information to design a practice session to achieve your targets and goals. Depending on the level of player will determine where you want to begin. Develop the session to a point where it looks like part of the game. (Proper supporting players, number of opponents)

7. What is your best coaching position?
8. What kind of warm up will lead up to the activity?
9. How will I start and restart the exercise in order to get plenty of repetitions of the targeted action?


During the Session:
1. Do things in a confident and authoritative manner.
2. Get into the session; do not slow things with lengthy explanations.
3. The warm-up should be appropriate. (Is it simple, can players do it)
4. Is the activity going to highlight what is trying to be achieved?
5. Is the space appropriate? Does it need adjustment?
6. Is the part of the field appropriate?
7. Is the number of players appropriate?
8. Are teams clearly distinguished?
9. Keep your instructions clear and simple.
10. Interest and motivate the players, don’t intimidate them.
11. Are you coaching the players or just imparting information?
12. Are you starting the exercise at the right instant and try to improve the execution of a player or group?
13. Do you correctly identify technical vs. tactical errors?


Planning a Practice Session:
1. Equal a training session to the length of a game.
2. Choose a topic for the session-have objectives set from a seasonal plan, or from what you saw during a recent game.
3. Activities in the session should flow. Minimize down time.
4. Teach from simple to complex.
5. Training should be clear and realistic.


Sections of the Practice:
1. Warm up: Purpose if to prepare the player physically and psychologically. (About 20% of the session) Warm up should be related to the activity/goal of the session.
2. Main Activity: Related to the game and take up approx. 50% of the session. The coach changes the subtleties of the session by:
Size of the space. (In general-10yards per player)
Number of players
The time to complete the tasks.
The number of touches.
The number of goals to attack or defend.
The number of balls
3. The Concluding Activity: 25 to 30 percent of the session. Should be as game like as possible. Relate teaching points to the game. All games should go to goal. The smaller the number of players involved, the clearer the teaching points. Restrictions are used to help “paint the picture”. Emphasis the goals of the training. Lift the restrictions as soon as possible (use restrictions for no more than one-third of the ending game. Make corrections as necessary, but not too many. Good idea to stop the activity only when the coach sees exactly what the particular game is designed to train. Reinforce the positive. Let the players play, sometimes the activity will self correct. Instead of telling players what to do, pose questions to them, and let them come up with the solution.
4. Warm-down: Cover approx. 5% of the session. Stretch and let players cool down. Use the time to positively reinforce the efforts of the players.

Note: any sprinting work for conditioning should be done at the end of the session, before the warm down.

This is the evaluation used for candidates that are performing the coaching portion of the National Coaching License form the NSCAA

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